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CSS syntax and rules

CSS syntax consists of a set of rules that determine how HTML elements are displayed on a web page. These rules are made up of selectors and declarations.

A selector is used to target an HTML element that you want to style, and a declaration is used to set one or more properties and values for that element.

Here is an example of CSS syntax:

selector {
  property: value;
  property: value;
}

The "selector" part targets the HTML element or elements that you want to style. This can be an element type (such as "p" for paragraphs), a class (such as ".my-class"), an ID (such as "#my-id"), or other types of selectors.

The "property" part sets the specific aspect of the element that you want to style. For example, "background-color" sets the background color of an element.

The "value" part sets the value of the property. For example, "red" sets the background color to red. Here is an example CSS rule that sets the background color of all paragraphs on a web page to yellow:

p {
  background-color: yellow;
}

In this example, "p" is the selector, and "background-color" and "yellow" are the property and value, respectively.

You can also set multiple properties and values for the same selector by separating them with a semicolon, like this:

p {
  background-color: yellow;
  color: black;
}

 In this example, the color of the text in paragraphs will also be set to black.

CSS rules can also be combined to target multiple elements at once or to create more complex styling. For example, you can use a class selector to target specific elements with a certain class:

.my-class {
  background-color: blue;
}

In this example, all HTML elements with the class "my-class" will have a blue background color.

Overall, CSS syntax is made up of selectors and declarations, and these rules determine how HTML elements are displayed on a web page.

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