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Grouping and Nesting Selectors

Grouping and nesting selectors are techniques used in CSS to make the styling process more efficient and organized.

Grouping selectors allows you to apply the same styles to multiple elements without repeating the same CSS rules. You can group selectors by separating them with commas in your CSS code.

Example:

h1, h2, h3 {
  font-family: sans-serif;
  color: #333;
}

In this example, the `font-family` and `color` styles will apply to all `h1`, `h2`, and `h3` elements on the page.

Nesting selectors is a way to target elements that are nested within other elements. To nest a selector, you simply add a space between the parent and child elements in your CSS code.

Example:

nav ul {
  list-style: none;
  padding: 0;
  margin: 0;
}

nav ul li {
  display: inline-block;
}

In this example, the first rule targets all `ul` elements that are children of a `nav` element, and the second rule targets all `li` elements that are children of a `ul` element that is a child of a `nav` element. This allows you to apply specific styles to nested elements without affecting other elements on the page.

You can also nest pseudo-classes and pseudo-elements in your CSS code.

Example:

a:hover {
  color: red;
}

ul li:first-child {
  font-weight: bold;
}

In this example, the first rule targets all `a` elements that are being hovered over by the user, and the second rule targets the first child `li` element in a `ul` element.

Nesting and grouping selectors can help you write more efficient and organized CSS code, but it's important to use these techniques sparingly and avoid creating overly complex selector chains, which can lead to specificity issues and make your code harder to maintain.

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